FRENCH BULLDOG
CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTLINE DEVELOPMENT

The French Bulldog has great character; he is amusing, intelligent and adaptable, whether it be in a castle or a cottage, a maisonette or mansion, and he deserves great popularity.  His temperament is delightful, with a charm and quaintness on one hand yet to be extremely positive on the other.

 

There are very few half measures about a French Bulldog; in play he is wholeheartedly in ‘the game’ giving all it takes to become a ‘prankish’ participant but, if he is ‘ put out’ for some reason, it takes a great deal to console him.  He is intelligent enough to make the most of his comfortable surroundings with which most owners or fanciers indulge him, and he soon becomes part of the family and a participant of most of the household activities.

 

The French Bulldog’s strength of character and his affection, his ‘clown like’ quality, sturdiness of body and agility will be seriously affected by any physical and mental ill treatment.

The Frenchie is a small dog (usually weighing between 20-30lbs) with a large chest, a wide front and, apart from the head, is similar to a small bulldog.  Having a roach and giving an impression of great strength within a small ‘package’ He is tremendously active, keeping remarkably fir by virtue of the great deal of exercise he can take in play and adventure.  He makes a wonderful show dog because he reacts so well to human companionship.  With training for the show ring, or similar activity, he appears to have a natural alertness with an ability to stand perfectly still and het be ‘on the ball’ without the loss of an attentive expression that projects an interest and inquisitive gaze at all that goes on around him.  He should not have a ‘cowered’ look and should appear to enjoy life with a spirit that is infectious.  He moves with freedom and assurance if he is in good health, fit and well.

 

The head of the French Bulldog is the breed’s notable focal point, the most prominent feature of this being the ‘Bat Ears’ which must be perfectly erect, should be rounded at the tip and forward facing.

 

(George Amos- Ruby Anniversary Year Book 1958-1998)